A new trial found that child epilepsy drug Epidiolex reduced child convulsion rates by around 50 percent.

The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first CBD-containing medication in June 2018 as a treatment for Dravet Syndrome.

Dravet Syndrome is an extremely rare form of epilepsy, affecting only 1 in 500 epileptic children, that usually arises in infancy.

Symptoms include high temperatures, stiffness and convulsions that typically last for 15-30 minutes, which can start occurring at six months of age.

Just under 200 minors took part in the newest Epidiolex trial. All of the participants had unsuccessful experiences with an average of four other prescribed epilepsy drugs.

Taking the medication for 14 weeks, the children of an average age of nine saw impressive results within weeks of starting the treatment.

Those taking the high-dose of 20mg per kilogram of body weight found that the amount of seizures with convulsions fell by 46 percent, and their total seizure-rate decreased by 47 percent.

The low-dose group had the best results after consuming 10mg/kg per day. Seizure rates fell by 56 percent and convulsion seizures reduced by 49 percent.

Dr Ian Miller will present this research next week alongside his colleagues at the annual American Academy of Neurology in Philadelphia.

Dr Miller said:

“I personally was surprised to see such a robust treatment effect of the lower dose. Side effects are less frequent at the lower dose, and this study justifies trying patients on the lower dose first, to assess efficacy and tolerance.”

This supporting evidence replicates the results from a 14-week trial conducted in 2017 that administered 20mg/kg of CBD to treat drug-resistant seizures.

All the participants in this study were also aged under 18.

62 percent of their caregivers reported an improvement in overall Dravet Syndrome symptoms with 5 percent of children becoming completely seizure-free.